Wednesday, 17 October 2012 21:35

Equine Therapy: Prison Inmate Programs

 

 

equine therapy in prisons

 

By Claire Dorotik, LMFT

While there may be some people who believe that inmates cannot, or should not be rehabilitated, returning them back to civilian life in a productive way is actually the original purpose of our prisons.

Published in Prisoner Support
By Brent Rose
Oct 24, 2011 12:00 PM

Do prison inmates surf the Internet? Do they have gadgets? Do they make gadgets? Do they make weapons? Where do they get their porn and booze?

On the outside, we enjoy lives built around the fruits of modernity. But what about prisoners? San Quentin sits on the San Francisco Bay, minutes away from the most technologically famous valley in the world, so we went to prison to find out how much of our 21st-century techno-culture has made it behind bars.

San Quentin Prison in San Quentin California

San Quentin State Prison is the stuff of legend. Hell, Johnny Cash wrote a song about it. A lot has changed since The Man in Black visited, but even more striking is what hasn't changed. Recently, Gizmodo had the rare opportunity to get inside this notorious prison. To say that it was enlightening is a serious understatement.

There are a lot of rules when you visit the slam: You can't wear blue, grey, or orange. Not a stitch: Those colors are reserved for inmates only—blue and grey for the full-time residents, and orange for guys who were still being processed and might well end up in a higher security prison. (They kept us far away from the guys in orange.) You also can't bring in a cell phone, a very coveted piece of contraband. And you most definitely cannot bring in anything that could be used as a weapon; not that they're hurting for weapons, as you'll find out tomorrow.

Published in Prisoner Support

Pregnant George Prison inmate in shackles

By Marie Diamond on Jul 1, 2011 at 12:25 pm

This year, the Georgia legislature considered a bill that would require women to prove their miscarriages “occurred naturally” and weren’t secret abortions. In a similar vein, the Guardian reports that states including Mississippi and Alabama are charging dozens of women with murder or other serious crimes who have miscarried or had stillbirths:

Across the US more and more prosecutions are being brought that seek to turn pregnant women into criminals.

Published in Prison Legal News