One cannot say that correctional agencies have not made their best efforts to address the problem. On the contrary, most have been committed to risk reduction for some time.

The report points to several factors proven to work, such as risk assessment, re-entry planning and post-release supervision. Research also suggests there is a direct correlation between strong family support and successful re-entry. The frequency and quality of communication play a significant role in those relationships.

Published in Prison Legal News

 

A national health care company is preparing to take over the job of providing medical services at the Lane County Jail in one of several county government moves aimed at reducing costs at the lockup.

Published in Current Events
by David Carey | Published October 31, 2011 at 4:26 PM

Global Tel Link Inmate Phone Service Now Belongs To American Securities.

American Securities LLC on Friday signed a $1 billion agreement to buy Global Tel Link Corp. from rival New York buyout firm Veritas Capital, a person familiar with the matter said.

The target's owners and creditors will receive $950 million at closing and an additional $50 million if certain contingencies are met, the source said. No formal deal announcement will be issued, the source added.

Veritas declined to comment. Neither American Securities nor Global Tel Link returned phone calls.

Veritas, an 82% owner, stands to reap more than a 325% gain on its $115 million, nearly 3-year-old investment in the Mobile, Ala.-based provider of telecom services to federal prison inmates. GS Direct LLC, an investment arm of Goldman, Sachs & Co., will earn a similar return on its $15 million outlay.

Published in Inmate Telephone News
Saturday, 30 April 2011 17:57

Cell phones sold to inmates?

11:28 AM, Jan 11, 2011 

Written by  

Cornell Barnard

prisonphoneSACRAMENTO -  John Brady saw a recent News10 story about a state prison inmate with his own cell phone  and Facebook account, and it made him start thinking.

An investigation is underway about that contraband phone and Facebook account by inmate Tiko Mack.

Brady says with more than 11,000 cell phones confiscated last year from prison inmates,  banning the phones will be impossible in the future.

Published in Inmate Telephone News

by John E. Dannenberg

Prison Legal News



An exhaustive analysis of prison phone contracts nationwide has revealed that with only limited exceptions, telephone service providers offer lucrative kickbacks (politely termed “commissions”) to state contracting agencies – amounting on average to 42% of gross revenues from prisoners’ phone calls – in order to obtain exclusive, monopolistic contracts for prison phone services.

These contracts are priced not only to unjustly enrich the telephone companies by charging much higher rates than those paid by the general public, but are further inflated to cover the commission payments, which suck over $152 million per year out of the pockets of prisoners’ families – who are the overwhelming recipients of prison phone calls. Averaging a 42% kickback nationwide, this indicates that the phone market in state prison systems is worth more than an estimated $362 million annually in gross revenue.

In a research task never before accomplished, Prison Legal News, using public records laws, secured prison phone contract information from all 50 states (compiled in 2008-2009 and representing data from 2007-2008). The initial survey was conducted by PLN contributing writer Mike Rigby, with follow-up research by PLN associate editor Alex Friedmann.

Published in Inmate Telephone News
Thursday, 21 April 2011 05:07

Prison Phone Kickbacks: Part 2

Regulation by State Agencies

Some actions before state regulatory agencies have had greater success. The Utilities Consumer Action Network filed a complaint against MCI with the California Public Utilities Commission over irregularities in the company’s billing practices and quality of service for calls originating from California prisons. In a 2001 settlement, MCI agreed to refund more than $520,000 in illegal overcharges to families of California prisoners. [See: PLN, Nov. 2001, p.19].

This followed a pattern of state regulatory actions and settlements dating from the early 1990s that saw a number of telecommunications companies fined and ordered to pay refunds due to illegal prison phone call billings.

In Louisiana, the state Public Service Commission ordered GTL to refund $1.2 million in overcharges from June 1993 to May 1994. In 1996, North American Intelecom agreed to refund $400,000 overcharged to members of the public who accepted prisoners’ phone calls, following an investigation by the Florida Public Service Commission. The following year the Commission ordered MCI to refund almost $2 million in overcharges on collect calls made from Florida state prisons. [See: PLN, Aug. 1998, p.8; March 1997, p.12; Sept. 1996, p.13].

Published in Inmate Telephone News